Corporate Fundraising

Most companies nowadays have heard about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programmes. Started by and usually connected to the bigger companies of this world (as the name would suggest) such initiatives are sometimes seen as not related to the core business and hard to manage. Both could not be further from the truth.

 

These days, a CSR policy and plan are becoming necessities for mid-sized law firms and businesses, but simply having one is not enough. Does your organisation’s CSR policy or plan avoid these five common pitfalls?

 

1. It was designed by copying someone else’s policy

Learning from what your competitors, clients and friends are doing is fine.

Copying what they’ve done on CSR is pointless.

Business Social Impact programs, also known as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives, have been questioned for many years and looked with skepticism for their role in the business strategy and actual impact on charities and society.

Below we will look into why such initiatives can be key to business success, as well as what digital tools are available for managing such a program.

 

One of the features of the life of Blackfriars Settlement is the frequent visits by individuals or teams of volunteers; fulfilling the widest array of activities imaginable. I want to record our most grateful thanks to all those from our Corporate Sponsors who have given their time, imagination and commitment to support our work.

What do ________ want?

It’s a fundamental question when it comes to fundraising and marketing in general. If you know what _______ wants, then you just need to give ‘it’ to them. And while it’s not easy to just create ‘it’, communicate ‘it’ and deliver ‘it’ to the right people, it sure beats doing all that work and finding out they don’t even want ‘it’ in the first place. Trying to understand needs is one reason I’ll be focusing more on research, stakeholder interviews and customer development in the future.

The BBC’s weekly technology programme BBC Click, which airs internationally and is presented by the show’s charismatic host Spencer Kelly, has recently featured KindLink in one of their episodes.

The role companies play in the community is changing. Many businesses today give cash donations and their employees volunteer their time in support of charities. But we are seeing some major changes in how companies approach community involvement, and in particular the value that is created: for charities, the causes they support and the businesses that invest in their communities.

The future of corporate giving project set out to explore how corporate community involvement could change over the next ten years.

CAF believes that philanthropy is a powerful tool for driving sustainability. Philanthropy enables
businesses to open a meaningful dialogue about their social values and aims with a breadth
of stakeholders - employees, customers, investors and wider society – in order to achieve
positive change.

Corporate Giving describes the donations made by corporations and private companies towards charitable
causes. This can be in the form of a cash or in-kind gift to a charity or community organisation.