Materials

How are other charities across the UK using digital? What are the skills gaps, and how do these effect the sustainability of the sector? How could digital help charities deal with the challenges it faces in 2017?

With a steady rise in small charities indicating likelihood of closure, sustainability is a growing issue. If governments fail to recognise the real value of the services delivered by small charities, if they continue the momentum to engage with larger private business to deliver wide scale contracts, they will fail to invest sufficiently in the small charity sector.

For the second year Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) and the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations (ACEVO) have produced the Social Landscape report. The aim of their research is to gain a unique insight into the voluntary sector from the perspective of its Chief Executives – to understand any challenges faced, and to assess the impact such challenges have on the sector’s ability to meet the needs of its beneficiaries.

Young people are very enthusiastic about charity and want to do more to support good causes, but only 2% of charities currently have a young trustee. This is despite research showing that 85% of people aged under 35 would consider becoming a trustee.

In 2015 CAF launched this Young Trustee Guide in order to try and address this trend, and ensure that both young people and charities are able to access the information necessary so that we can create the next generation of young trustees.

Welcome to the 2013 Social Charity Study, our third annual review of social and digital activity amongst the UK charity sector, and this year there have been some startling findings.

This study examines the impact of corporate philanthropy growth on sales growth using a large sample of charitable contributions made by U.S. public companies from 1989 through 2000. Applying Granger causality tests, we find that charitable contributions are significantly associated with future revenue, whereas the association between revenue and future contributions is marginally significant at best. We then identify the mechanism underlying our findings.

This 2014 Barometer edition draws on the experience of 130 leading companies and NGOs who completed our confidential survey during July 2014.


Interesting trends are now emerging from the series as the five-year data demonstrate. Overall, it is noticeable how high up the agenda NGO partnerships now are for corporates – particularly at a senior level, and how there is a real opportunity for NGOs to help corporates communicate the effects of their partnerships better, most notably to external audiences.

The role companies play in the community is changing. Many businesses today give cash donations and their employees volunteer their time in support of charities. But we are seeing some major changes in how companies approach community involvement, and in particular the value that is created: for charities, the causes they support and the businesses that invest in their communities.

The future of corporate giving project set out to explore how corporate community involvement could change over the next ten years.

CAF has been producing the UK Giving report since 2004, and has been tracking giving in the UK for
several decades. In that time, there have been a number of changes to how the study is conducted
in terms of approach and questions asked. This is the second year in which the research has been
conducted on the GfK National Omnibus.